Bay Area ICE spokesman resigns, refused to deliver 'misleading facts,' report says

Bay Area ICE spokesman resigns, refused to deliver 'misleading facts,' report says

Bay Area ICE spokesman resigns, refused to deliver 'misleading facts,' report says

Former ICE spokesman James Schwab pointed to statements made by Acting ICE Director Tom Homan and Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who have stated that Schaaf's warning February 24 about an ICE raid in Northern California resulted in several hundred undocumented immigrants from eluding arrest, according to multiple media outlets, including the San Francisco Chronicle, KTVU and CNN. He also stated that though he pushed back on those statements and wanted the agency to correct the "800" number frequently used in reference to the amount of "criminal aliens" who escaped the raid, ICE told him to "deflect" questions from the media.

ICE spokesperson Liz Johnson issued the following statement regarding Schwab's resignation.

He explained that the enforcement agency would have been unlikely to capture all of the roughly 1,000 undocumented immigrants in the area that it had targeted, and that it was incorrect to identify those who were not detained as threats to public safety.

"I told them that the information was wrong, they asked me to deflect, and I didn't agree with that", he said, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

On the third day of the crackdown, Homan said: "864 criminal aliens and public safety threats remain at large in the community, and I have to believe that some of them were able to elude us thanks to the mayor's irresponsible decision". "But to blame her for 800 unsafe people out there is just false", he continued.

"I commend Mr. Schwab for speaking the truth while under intense pressure to lie", she said in a statement to The Post. "Then I took some time and I quit", Schwab said.

The Trump administration recently sued California for three laws it argues prevent immigration officials from carrying out federal immigration law.

While announcing a raid that yielded 232 arrests in Northern California, ICE suggested that California's laws increased the likelihood that immigrants without criminal convictions would face detainment.

And so, operation "Keep Safe" was more successful than the agency had hoped, Schwab said.




President Donald Trump didn't stay behind in fabricating the figures as he said "close to 1,000" would have gotten arrested if the mayor hadn't issued her warning.

"I just couldn't bear the burden - continuing on as a representative of the agency and charged with upholding integrity, knowing that information was false", Schwab told CNN.

Mr. Homan also blasted U.S. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who called ICE enforcement actions last month "unjust and cruel".

Sanctuary cities are actually enticing more people to pay smugglers to help them make the unsafe trek north, not only putting people at risk but also enriching the smuggling cartels themselves, a senior administration official said Monday.

"Our democracy depends on public servants who act with integrity and hold transparency in the highest regard", she said. "Even though those previous statements did not clarify the wrong information".

Emails and calls to ICE headquarters and the Attorney General's Office, both in Washington, D.C., were not immediately returned. "I've never been in a situation when I've been asked to ignore the facts because it was more convenient".

Schwab said he doesn't want to out any particular people in the agency but said he felt he had to make a statement by quitting to do the right thing in his mind.

The president will visit California on Tuesday for the first time as president to inspect prototypes for his proposed border wall along the southern border.

Latest News