Trudeau Puts Money Where His Mouth Is On Pipeline Dispute

Trudeau Puts Money Where His Mouth Is On Pipeline Dispute

Trudeau Puts Money Where His Mouth Is On Pipeline Dispute

It has been a week since Kinder Morgan announced it was halting all non-essential spending on the plan to build a second, bigger pipeline parallel to the existing one between Edmonton and Burnaby, B.C. The company gave the Trudeau government until the end of May to reassure its investors the pipeline would be built, despite mounting opposition. "We only find ourselves here [on Sunday] because of his demonstrable hostility to Canada's energy industry his cancellation of the Northern Gateway pipeline, his killing of the Energy East pipeline by changing the regulatory rules mid-stream, his surrender to Barack Obama's Veto of Keystone XL and his two years of inaction on the Trans Mountain Pipeline".

Trudeau spoke after an emergency meeting with the premier of British Columbia, who opposes plans to nearly triple the capacity of the company's Trans Mountain pipeline from oil-rich Alberta to the west coast.

Trudeau declined to discuss the specifics of Ottawa's proposed financial buy-in, saying only that the feds "have engaged in financial discussions with the Kinder Morgan".

A number of First Nations chiefs have said Indigenous rights have been forgotten in the inter-government quarrelling over the pipeline.

Trudeau, meanwhile, has long insisted the Kinder Morgan pipeline is within federal jurisdiction and that Horgan's government has no authority to block it - a claim Horgan wants the courts to evaluate, and one with which he says he plans to press ahead.

The move has been the subject of a heated trade battle between B.C. and Alberta since January and has seen almost 200 people arrested for demonstrating at Kinder Morgan work sites in Burnaby.

Horgan's opposition to Trans Mountain is rooted in part in the fact that his NDP government depends on the support of the Green Party, who opposes the project.

Horgan made clear that Trudeau made no threats and made it clear he had no intention of punishing B.C. residents.

"Unfortunately, over the course of nearly a year, they have not specifically put forward proposals on how they would like to see us improve the oceans protection plan", said Trudeau.

Except Indigenous communities, he added, who as usual were not at the table.




Speaking before the meeting, a federal government source said past examples of help included a bailout of the auto industry in 2009, federal loan guarantees for a hydro-electric project and Ottawa's investment in an offshore energy project.

Indeed, knowledge is limited when it comes to how diluted bitumen - known colloquially as dilbit - interacts with water, and how best to contain and clean it up.

"Alberta has promised to release legislation this week but it's not clear what that's about", she said.

"I'm quite confident that should these discussions end successfully, that the pipeline will be built - and that is good, because the pipeline is in the national interest", she said.

The prime minister didn't shy away from criticizing Horgan.

"His damaging policies. have only led to more uncertainty and instability in Canada's resource sector", Scheer said.

Notley has said Alberta could buy an equity stake in the pipeline, or even buy the whole thing if necessary.

Notley called B.C.'s actions a "considered attempt to create uncertainty" and said Alberta won't engage in "esoteric debates" meant to "to harass a project to death".

"B.C.ers and Albertans are not opponents; they are neighbours", the prime minister said.

"It will be built", Trudeau told reporters, as he predicted work on the pipeline would begin again by early summer.

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