E.Coli Outbreak Expected to Worsen

Chopped romaine lettuce is at the heart of a multi-state E. coli outbreak the CDC said

Chopped romaine lettuce is at the heart of a multi-state E. coli outbreak the CDC said

The CDC said Wednesday that April 16 was the last day romaine lettuce was harvested in the Yuma area.

Since product labels often come without the identification of the growing region, we suggest you pass on romaine lettuce if you are uncertain about where it was grown.

Unless you know where the lettuce came from, consumers anywhere in the US who have any store-bought romaine lettuce at home should not eat it and should throw it away.

An E.coli outbreak that has sickened almost 150 people in 29 states so far is likely to worsen, according to an update Tuesday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Health officials say almost two dozen more cases of a food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown in Arizona have been reported. So, it should no longer be in stores and restaurants because of its three-week shelf life.




The health department is advising people that if they don't know where their romaine lettuce originated, they shouldn't eat it.

Twenty-three more people fell ill since the last update on May 9, bringing the total to 172 people from 32 states, the CDC said on Wednesday.

Farmers in California reported a drop in romaine lettuce sales since the outbreak was reported.

It's the worst outbreak of E. coli since 2006 when illnesses traced to spinach killed three and sickened more than 270. The strain of E. coli, known as O157:H7, produces a Shiga toxin that can affect people seriously, causing diarrhea and vomiting and in severe cases kidney failure.

The agency continues with its investigation to find the source of the contamination.

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