World Cup victor Ray Wilson dies aged 83

Bobby Charlton leads tributes to 1966 winner Ray Wilson			
				 
   by Matthew Nash 
  Published

Bobby Charlton leads tributes to 1966 winner Ray Wilson by Matthew Nash Published

Ray Wilson, the left back in all six of England's games in its World Cup-winning campaign in 1966, has died.

Wilson's former clubs Everton, Huddersfield Town, Oldham Athletic and Bradford City all paid tribute.

Wilson spent the majority of his playing days with Huddersfield Town, where he played 283 games and won the FA Cup with Everton in the same year he won the World Cup with his country.

Former Everton and Huddersfield Town full-back Wilson had been battling Alzheimer's disease.

"He is a World Cup victor and played in the last England team that had four, maybe five, world class players".

At 32, Wilson was the oldest player in the England lineup that beat West Germany 4-2 in extra time in the final at Wembley Stadium in July 1966.




A fast and dependable defender, Wilson started out at Huddersfield in 1952, combining soccer with work on the railways.

After soccer, he worked for his father-in-law's undertaker business. The kit was made with the tag line "Legends Are Rarely Made" to mark the 50th anniversary of winning the World Cup, and Wilson's signature could be seen just below the club's crest.

It has been confirmed that former England worldwide Ramon "Ray" Wilson MBE has passed away at the age of 83, following a 14 year battle with Alzheimer's disease.

Team members Martin Peters, Nobby Stiles, and Jack Charlton were also suffering from memory loss or dementia.

"I've been informed that in the squad it's quite a few more".

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