Know what is Nipah virus

Named Nipah virus infection the newly emerging zoonosis that affects both animals and humans are known to be spread by fruit bats

World News: Extremely uncommon 'mind swelling' Nipah virus kills 13 and leaves at the very least 200 in hospital in India amid fears of a worldwide epidemic

In the two suspected cases reported in Kerala, he believes they are still carrying out the tests to ascertain if it is of the virus. A railway staff at the Thivim railway station noticed him and took him to the North District Hospital at Mapusa on May 26 morning. "In both cases, the symptoms are same but we can not reach to a conclusion of it being Nipah virus infection at this stage".

Speaking to Herald, GMC Medical Superintendent (MS) Dr Shivanand Bandekar said the patient is now being treated as a case of viral encephalitis and not Nipah.

It also states that lab tests have confirmed that the virus spreads through chicken and the state health department has found Nipah virus in about 60 per cent of the chicken brought from Tamil Nadu. The patient's identity was not disclosed by GMCH. "We are taking all steps to check the spread of such false messages through social media", the District Collector said.




State epidemiologist Dr Utkarsh Betodkar said that the patient's urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples were drawn and have been sent to the NIV and the report of the same is expected by Tuesday evening. "That is why we were giving priority to trace some 753 contacts who were in touch with the confirmed cases".

In the wake of the outbreak in Kerala, which has claimed 13 lives until now, the Bihar government, Sikkim health department, Madhya Pradesh Health Ministry, and Pudducherry collector office have issued advisories urging the people of their respective states to take precaution against the disease.

The Goa government has formed a committee, headed by the state's Health Secretary, to draw a protocol to deal with Nipah virus cases, if any, in the state. The virus was first identified in Malaysia and Singapore in 1999, during an outbreak of encephalitis and respiratory illness among pig farmers. It said it was banning fresh produce, including mangoes, dates and bananas - the bats' preferred fruits.

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