Major study finds many breast cancer patients can skip chemotherapy

Major study finds many breast cancer patients can skip chemotherapy

Major study finds many breast cancer patients can skip chemotherapy

"Any woman with early-stage breast cancer age 75 or younger should have the 21-gene expression test and discuss the results with her doctor to guide her decision to the right therapy". "This clinical trial is looking at women who have slightly higher risk scores - technically considered to be in the intermediate risk range".

However an estimated 25% of patients stop within two years because they can not endure the side effects, lead author Dr Sherry Shen, of the New York Presbyterian Hospital, said. The study confirmed that using a 21-gene analyzation to assess cancer recurrence risk can successfully indicate whether or not a woman needs to undergo invasive and unnecessary chemotherapy treatment. The trial enrolled 10,273 women with this type of breast cancer at 1,182 sites in the United States, Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, and Peru.

"The new results from TAILORx give clinicians high-quality data to inform personalized treatment recommendations for women", said lead author Joseph A. Sparano, M.D., associate director for clinical research at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center and Montefiore Health System in New York City and vice chair of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group.

"70% of women with the most common form of early stage breast cancer could be treated safely with just surgery and hormone therapy."

A low test score means patients can forgo the treatment, as well as its toxic side effects, while a high score means women would greatly benefit.




"However, this is a small study so more research is needed before we have clear-cut answers on the benefits of fish oil for easing pain from breast cancer treatment".

"This study is an example of how treatments can be refined in an attempt to work better for patients", said ASCO expert Dr. Andrew Epstein.

- Local breast cancer doctors are excited about the results of a trial involving 10,000 women. And while it doesn't officially wrap up until Tuesday afternoon, the confab's already produced a flurry of news on the latest in cancer drug development, from updates on immune therapy R&D to the promise (and, importantly, the limitations) of newfangled treatments for a growing number of cancers.

The study was supported in part by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Komen Foundation, and the Breast Cancer Research Stamp. It was first issued in 1998 and has been reissued multiple times since, and has raised more than $86 million for breast cancer research.

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