Californians to vote in November on breaking into 3 separate states

3 states update Measure To Split California Into 3 States Qualifies For November Ballot

Californians to vote in November on breaking into 3 separate states

A plan to divide California into three states will appear on the November ballot after the campaign received more than 600,000 signatures.

As Los Angeles ABC News affiliate KABC-7 reported Tuesday evening, the campaign, led by Silicon Valley billionaire venture capitalist Tim Draper, turned in 600,000 signatures, almost twice the 365,000 that were required.

Said Peggy Grande of Citizens for Cal 3, the campaign on behalf of the initiative: "The California state government isn't too big to fail, because it is already failing its citizens in so many crucial ways".

The three new states would consist of Northern California, extending from the San Francisco Bay Area north to the OR border and east to the Nevada border; California, including Los Angeles County and extending northwest along the Central Coast; and Southern California, including San Diego and the rest of the southern part of the state.

The remaining 40 counties would be part of the state of Northern California or a name chosen by its residents.

Southern California will consist of a number of counties in the state's Central Valley, Inland Empire, and southern coastal regions, including Fresno, San Bernardino, Orange, and San Diego Counties.

The initiative depends on Article IV, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, where the document sets the conditions under which a state can split itself up. In the unlikely event the measure is approved, the change would be the first division of an existing US state since the creation of West Virginia in 1863.




It would be the first division of an existing US state since the creation of West Virginia in 1863.

One of the many, many efforts to break up the state of California into smaller, more governable chunks has made it onto the November ballot.

"To create three states from a standing start, you'll get all the benefits of knowing all the things that worked in the past, and all the things that could work in the future and you get to eliminate all the baggage you got in the state", Draper said in a May news conference at Draper University.

According to the proposal, this will solve issues in the state including failing school systems, high taxes, deteriorating infrastructure, and strained government.

But even if people vote for the plan, it still requires Congressional approval.

This will not be the first time such a ballot would take place.

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