Kim-Trump summit making headlines in global media

Just over half of all Americans say they approve of how President Donald Trump has handled North Korea, but only a quarter think that his summit this week with Kim Jong Un will lead to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Wednesday.

Another headache for USA officials in Japan: The agreement says nothing about North Korean short- and medium-range missile tests and development, a particular concern for Japan, located a chip shot away from North Korea.

He said that Trump's tweet was made "with eyes wide open" to the possibility diplomacy could falter, and that the USA wants North Korea to take "major" nuclear disarmament steps within the next two years - before the end of Trump's first term in 2021.

Skeptics of how much the meeting achieved pointed to the North Korean leadership's long-held view that nuclear weapons are a bulwark against what it fears are US plans to overthrow it and unite the Korean peninsula.

As he flew home from Singapore, Trump was already shifting his attention back to this season's larger story arc. The likelihood of Trump launching a first strike against North Korea, thus setting South Korea, where more than 100,000 Americans live and/or work, ablaze and risking a strike against population centers in the US, was similarly low.

Joel Wit, a Stimson Center senior fellow and North Korea expert, told NPR that in such a timeline "you could probably disarm key portions of the North Korea nuclear program".

North Korea is believed to possess more than 50 nuclear warheads, with its atomic program spread across more than 100 sites constructed over decades to evade global inspections.

Meanwhile, allies and analysts were left scratching their heads over what President Trump and Kim Jong-un actually agreed to.

The Wall Street Journal's editorial board, for example, said that "there is little in the joint communique or in North Korean statements to demonstrate that Kim has committed to do what Mr. Trump claims" and "there are no details about timing or process or specific goals".

Pompeo's comments came after North Korean state media reported on Wednesday that Trump had agreed to a "step-by-step" process, suggesting that North Korea would gain concessions from the U.S. at the same time.




Sherman, a special advisor to former President Bill Clinton and policy coordinator on North Korea said the two leaders were acting more in the interests of their leadership standing than efforts to denuclearise North Korea.

Russian Federation has encouraged de-escalation talks between the USA and North Korea.

China is set to overtake the U.S. as the world's dominant power within the coming decades.

North Korea could begin giving up its weapons today if it wanted to, but it instead has insisted on staging performances of denuclearization rather than on inviting global inspectors to verify its progress.

When South Korean President Moon Jae-in met Pompeo early Thursday, he reiterated Trump's upbeat assessment of the summit, saying that the world had "escaped the threat of nuclear war".

The statement made no mention of verification, despite Trump's longstanding insistence on "complete, verifiable and irreversible" denuclearization. Trump has labeled Trudeau "weak" and "dishonest" after the Canadian leader pushed back on USA tariffs.

Pompeo said Trump was alluding to the fact that it was the first time a sitting USA president had met with Kim, adding that both leaders had a "blunt conversation" about the need for the communist state to rejoin the world community.

Japanese officials are planning to unofficially consult with North Korean officials during a two-day global conference in Mongolia through Friday.

"It is the only dialogue that matters", Trump wrote to Kim late last month.

Yet even as US and South Korean officials sought to parlay the momentum from the dramatic summit into more progress on the nuclear issue, there were persistent questions about whether Trump had given away too much in return for too little. -South Korean war games, without getting much in return. The Korean War ended in 1953 without a peace treaty, leaving the United States and North Koreas in a technical state of war. He told reporters that if the US concludes they no longer are, the freeze "will no longer be in effect".

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