'Relentless rains' continue as Florence almost stalls over Carolinas

'It Looks Like a Battlefield': Man Trapped in Home By Florence Speaks With 'Fox & Friends'

‘Uninvited Brute’: NC Gov Says Florence Could Wipe Out Entire Communities

NOAA NOAA / Reuters Hurricane Florence is shown from a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) #GOESEast satellite shortly after the storm made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, US, 14 September.

By Friday evening, Florence was downgraded to a tropical storm, its winds weakened to 112 km/h as it moved forward at 6km/h about 25 kilometres north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

At 5 p.m., Florence had been downgraded to a tropical storm, with sustained winds of 70 miles per hour.

Right now, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Hurricane Center is predicting that Florence will become a tropical storm tomorrow (Sept. 15) over SC, continue northwest to eastern Kentucky, then swing northeast and track over most of New England early next week.

Tropical Storm Florence keeps drenching the central Carolinas and is expected to generate up to 380 millimetres of rain before it swings north over the Appalachian Mountains and into the Ohio Valley on Monday.

This story will be updated with additional information momentarily.

The South Carolina Emergency Management Division called the insurance rumor "FALSE" over social media, saying that the claim had spread to SC residents. Dozens more were rescued from a collapsed motel.

Storm surge was as high as 10 feet on the Neuse River, he said.

Floodwaters surged over roads, prompting the closing of Interstate 95 just north of the Carolinas' border.

Dolphins have been seen swimming close to the shoreline in high water caused by Hurricane Florence.




The two remaining fishing piers in Carteret County were damaged after Florence landed off the North Carolina coast and continues to churn on Friday. Gusts reached over 100 miles per hour - the highest recorded in North Carolina since 1958.

About 100 people still need to be rescued in New Bern, North Carolina, where some 4200 homes have been damaged, the mayor told CNN.

A mother and her child were killed in Wilmington when a tree fell on their home on Friday.

In Jacksonville, a relentless band of heavy rain gutted buildings, drenched streets and left wildlife to battle the rising waters.

Two fins were spotted in the high water in Wilmington.

Nearly 800,000 people are reported to be without power already in North Carolina, and officials have warned restoring electricity could take days or even weeks.

In Fayetteville and Wilmington, officials said more evacuations were possible as the Cape Fear River continues to rise above record heights.

Forecasters said the storm will eventually break up over the southern Appalachians and make a sharp rightward swing to the northeast, its rainy remnants moving into the mid-Atlantic states and New England by the middle of the week.

North Carolina alone is forecast to get 9.6 trillion gallons, enough to cover the Tar Heel state to a depth of about 10 inches. Rescue crews have used boats to reach hundreds of people trapped by the rising waters.

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