Trump Called the Fed's Rate Hikes 'Crazy.' The Banking World Respectfully Disagrees

President Trump spoke with reporters after arriving at Erie International Airport for a campaign rally at Erie Insurance Arena on Wednesday

Trump says Federal Reserve ‘has gone crazy’ after big stock drop

U.S. President Donald Trump said Wednesday's stock market sell-off was a correction that was long awaited, and that the Federal Reserve, which has been raising interest rates, has gone "crazy".

Earlier on Tuesday, White House economist Kevin Hassett said the administration respects the Fed's independence and pointed to Trump's nominees to the central bank as evidence of its non-partisan approach to the setting of monetary policy.

Those financial crisis-inspired programmes - such as quantitative easing - are now ending and the Fed has raised U.S. interest rates three times already this year - raising borrowing costs - and could add a fourth hike by the end of 2018.

But as the economy began to post solid and consistent growth following the global financial crisis of 2008, and prices began to creep higher, the central bank was anxious to return to a more normal policy.

Trump has taken a number of steps this year to further juice the economy, including boosting federal spending.

"It will remind all of us that when you are a member of a club and you decide to stay in that club, then you play by the rules of the club", she said.

"I think we don't have to go as fast", the president answered to a question about the Fed raising rates by CNBC from the south lawn of the White House.

Investors are leaning into safer stocks with steady dividends - utilities and consumer staples - and pulling out of the higher-paying, higher-risk stocks as other guideposts of growth, like the communication sector, tumbled.

Powell and Trump haven't personally discussed the matter, the Fed chair has said, but Trump's rhetoric has alarmed some Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill.




It was the latest in series of recent barrages the president has unleashed at the Fed, which under his hand-picked chairman, Jerome Powell, has been gradually raising rates as the economy has strengthened to prevent a run-up in inflation.

Trump said Thursday he wouldn't fire Fed Chairman Jerome Powell, although he added he knew more about interest rate policy than the Fed does. "I think what they're doing is wrong", Mr. Trump said. The 10 year U.S. Treasury, a key benchmark for rates, has been spiking and is now at 3.2 percent, one of its highest levels since just after the Great Recession.

Although the drop was unusually large, the stock market has been on a historic run of gain since the president's inauguration.

"And we just try to do the right thing for the medium and longer term for the country". The central bank expects to raise the federal funds rate one more time in 2018 and three times in 2019.

Trump's latest attack on the USA central bank appeared to blame the Federal Reserve for a stock rout that market analysts mostly attributed to fresh concern about his trade war with China. "The problem in my opinion is Treasuries and the Fed".

Responding to big losses on Wall Street, President Trump said Thursday that he understands the economy better than the Federal Reserve. His criticism breaks a longtime political tradition.

Part of the recent rout in U.S. stocks has been down to sharp falls in the so-called Faang companies - Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google.

"I don't think he's calling out the Fed, quote-unquote".

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